10 Year History Chart Investment Tool

I was browsing through the SMF Yahoo Groups and I came across a nice looking spreadsheet that graphs up to 10 years of information. When I look for or create spreadsheets my focus is on ease of use and pleasing aesthetics. If at first glance the spreadsheet is overwhelming, no one will want to use it, including myself. With that in mind, I bring you this new spreadsheet.

Screen Shot

What It Does

Enter any ticker (not all information for financial companies will be displayed) and the spreadsheet will grab the following data and more.

  • Cash Flow (Continuing Operations)
  • Enterprise Value
  • EPS (Diluted, Total Operations)
  • Market CapitalizationMagic Formula Investing — Earnings Yield
  • Magic Formula Investing — Return on Capital
  • Net Income (Continuing Operations)Net Profit
  • Net Profit Margin
  • Operating Revenue
  • Piotroski F-score
  • Return on Assets (ROA)
  • Return on Equity (ROE)
  • Stock Price
  • Current Ratio
  • Quick Ratio

How To Use

All the formulas and data have been updated in the Data tab so it should work for everyone from the get go.

Installation of the SMF-addin is required and the installation instructions can be found here.

There is only one input field and that is the yellow box in the top left corner. To change the chart type, select or click on the title of each graph and a drop down box will appear which will allow you to select which charts you want to display.

Recommended Additional Usage

You could also integrate this spreadsheet into the 10yr or 5yr spreadsheets to reduce file management. That way, you can load everything in one spreadsheet.

Full credit goes to the SMF add-in group for providing the template.


10 Year History Charts Spreadsheet

You can now download the premium version with the 10 year charts incorporated. Click here.

  • joe

    Great site. I started forming my own opinion on how I should go about investing, and then I found this site that has helped take it to the next level.

    The next part I am trying to get down is how to make a comfortable estimate of how much room is there b/t my purchase price, the floor and ceiling. I know that using a margin of safety in a great business helps take away downside risk (so that there is less likely a floor of $0), while also giving you room b/t the purchase price and the intrinsic value (which is what we believe is a fair price, so not exactly the ceiling).

    Are you using any specific ratios (assets/share, liquidation value, free cash/share, etc) to see how far a stock could drop, or any ratios for how high it may go (estimate growth investors will take the current P/E to around 40, historical highs in similar environments, etc.). Or do you use trend lines for support/resistance?

    I know that these are all rough estimates, some may seem to fit better in certain situations, etc., but I am trying to find an “educated guess” for these so that I can better understand the probabilities of success/failure. It would also help me be able to plug these into the Kelly formula to give me an “educated guess” as to how much of my bankroll to use per investment, since I am playing around with that right now too.

    Might make for a nice spreadsheet to add on to the other great one’s you have.

    Thanks for your help,

  • Hi Joe,

    I thought your question would be a good topic for a post. My response started to get long for a comment haha

  • Your tools are quite helpful. Good job developing them…

    BTW, what’s the difference between the premium version (pay) and the free ones?

  • The premium includes the valuations, graphs, competitor comparison, charts all rolled into one. The free spreadsheets only have 1 valuation page.

    If you downloaded the spreadsheets before I divided them, the only difference is I combined everything.

    Hope that helps. Thanks for asking.

  • These spreadsheets are definitely a great tool in automating certain parts of every fundamental investor’s stock analysis.

    Thanks a lot for sharing them with us Jae Jun. I hope you sell 100,000 spreadsheets.

    Best Wishes,
    Dividend Growth Investor

  • I wish I could sell 1,000,000 but it doesn’t seem like my $1 per post fee for this blog is going to increase any time soon 🙂

    However, the free ones are just as good if people are willing to put the effort into expanding and developing it themselves.

Ready to try Old School Value?